Sound is technically an oscillation of pressure, i.e. waves, through a material. We generally experience sound as waves in our atmosphere, which is a gas, air. Gases are fairly separated particles moving rapidly and not well-connected to each other. There is also gas in space. Nebulae are interstellar clouds of dust and gas, often very pretty seen through a telescope.
So is there sound in nebulae? Luckily one member of the Clear Science staff moonlights at JPL when not clarifying science, and knew exactly how to approach this question. Let’s use the Horsehead Nebula as an example, which is what’s called a dark nebula. The Horsehead Nebula is in Orion, and was discovered in 1888 by Williamina Fleming at Harvard College. (You heard that right, Williamina was a woman, although science was pretty male back then.)
By the way, the visualization of sound waves shown above is from Bell Labs, and the Clear Science staff got the image from Modern Mechanix, one of the best websites on the internet. They love black and white science just like the Clear Science staff does.

Sound is technically an oscillation of pressure, i.e. waves, through a material. We generally experience sound as waves in our atmosphere, which is a gas, air. Gases are fairly separated particles moving rapidly and not well-connected to each other. There is also gas in space. Nebulae are interstellar clouds of dust and gas, often very pretty seen through a telescope.

So is there sound in nebulae? Luckily one member of the Clear Science staff moonlights at JPL when not clarifying science, and knew exactly how to approach this question. Let’s use the Horsehead Nebula as an example, which is what’s called a dark nebula. The Horsehead Nebula is in Orion, and was discovered in 1888 by Williamina Fleming at Harvard College. (You heard that right, Williamina was a woman, although science was pretty male back then.)

By the way, the visualization of sound waves shown above is from Bell Labs, and the Clear Science staff got the image from Modern Mechanix, one of the best websites on the internet. They love black and white science just like the Clear Science staff does.