The Clear Science staff was going to answer the question "Is there a decay rate in heat at distance from a flame/heat source?" To do that let’s consider one way that heat transports from one place to another: conduction.
Heat is energy. Say we have a flame on the left and no flame on the right. The flame is there because some chemical reaction is happening: chemical bonds are breaking and their energy is being liberated. Because of this the temperature of the flame is high, like 1500 degrees. On the right temperature is only room temperature or 20 degrees.
Heat moves by conduction from high temperatures to low ones. This is a basic property of the universe, and it is described by Fourier’s law. Written above in “math language,” what it says in English is "heat flux is proportional to the negative of the temperature gradient." Or: heat fluxes from high temp to low.

The Clear Science staff was going to answer the question "Is there a decay rate in heat at distance from a flame/heat source?" To do that let’s consider one way that heat transports from one place to another: conduction.

Heat is energy. Say we have a flame on the left and no flame on the right. The flame is there because some chemical reaction is happening: chemical bonds are breaking and their energy is being liberated. Because of this the temperature of the flame is high, like 1500 degrees. On the right temperature is only room temperature or 20 degrees.

Heat moves by conduction from high temperatures to low ones. This is a basic property of the universe, and it is described by Fourier’s law. Written above in “math language,” what it says in English is "heat flux is proportional to the negative of the temperature gradient." Or: heat fluxes from high temp to low.